The Church Course

St Enodoc's Church course is a James Braid design that enjoys a justified reputation as one of the West Country's finest links layouts. It may not look it but the par 5 1st is one of the easier holes even if you have to thread your way carefully between the sand dunes. Pars are harder to come by on the long par 4 2nd and 3rd holes. A real flavour of the course can be obtained by watching our helicopter fly overs.

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The Church Course plan

The 6th really sticks in the mind - a 378-yarder that kinks left at driving distance then climbs up to the green. A hidden fairway bunker may catch out longer players seeking a view of the green but laying up short and right leaves a blind shot over the cavernous "Himalaya" bunker you simply don't want to be in. Rumour has it that it is the biggest bunker in Europe but it does have a few rivals for the title. Use your head on this one because it's very easy to make a stupid mistake here.

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The 1st green framed by Stepper Point and the sea

The 10th hole is often described as the course's signature hole as it winds its way towards 11th Century St. Enodoc Church where John Betjeman lies buried beside his favourite course. It is Stroke Index 1 for good reason! A good drive needs to be followed by an even better second aimed at the church porch to avoid the lateral hazard which runs the length of the hole which creeps ever closer to the left side of the green.

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The 6th hole with the famous Himalaya bunker

Over the memorable final stretch it is hard to find the right club on the downhill par 3 15th, while the par 5 16th boasts a rollercoaster fairway and potentially distracting sea views all the way down the right. The hole has been lengthened to 560 yards with a two-tier green surrounded by deep bunkers and has now become a stern test particularly into wind and sets the tone for the closing three holes.

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View from the 15th tee of the green and the Camel Estuary in the background

To finish well you'll need to conjure up your best strikes to make par on the long par 3 17th and fittingly tough 446 yard 18th. As you putt out in full view of the clubhouse, you'll probably have total recall of all the magnificent holes you've just enjoyed - a sign of a truly great course.

Click here (requires Adobe Acrobat reader) to read a hole-by-hole-by-hole guide by our professional Nick Williams on how to play the course.

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Score card for the Church Course

At 6557 yards it is not long by today's standards yet strangely the new course record is 65, only 4 under par so it is far from a push over. It is often said that many links courses are easy if there is no wind - even St. Andrews - but somehow that really does not apply to St Enodoc.

Over the years the club has hosted many top amateur events; including the English Ladies Amateur Championships in 1993 and 2002 and the English Counties Championship in 1989 and 2005.

For visitors, men will be asked to produce a handicap certificate of 24 or less and ladies 28. Why do we insist upon it? We feel that with the type of terrain of the course a player needs to have reached a reasonable standard of play in order to relish the course to the full. Players who struggle will certainly go home disappointed and besides will probably have held up a lot of frustrated players behind them. Part of the success of the Holywell course is that it caters for players of all standards.